What is the StealthSwitch II?

 

StealthSwitch II FootSwitch

StealthSwitch II FootSwitch

 

The StealthSwitch II is a fully programmable USB foot switch capable of sending keystrokes, hotkeys, macros or mouse clicks in any program.  The StealthSwitch II comes with configuration software for Windows (XP and Vista 32,64, Windows 7 32,64) and MAC OSX.  Once programmed the configuration software is no longer required since all settings are stored in the switch hardware itself virtually eliminating the possibility of software conflicts.  The possibilities are limited only by your imagination.  If a program can be controlled with keystrokes or hotkeys, it will work with the StealthSwitch II.  Configuration is fast and easy.

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Applications:

  • The StealthSwitch II has been used as a push-to-talk footswitch in VOIP gaming programs like Ventrilo, TeamSpeak, Xfire, WOW, Second Life, etc.
  • Trigger for commercial PhotoBooths
  • Foot Pedal control of transcription software
  • Foot control for PC based teleprompter
  • Electronic music page turner
  • Foot Control of electronic test equipment
  • Assistive Technology Switch Interface
  • Control for Dragon Naturally Speaking
  • Gamers – Bind any keystroke or hotkey in any game

The StealthSwitch II comes with 1 integrated footswitch and support for up to 4 inexpensive slave switches.

 

StealhSwitch II with Cable Squid

StealhSwitch II with Cable Squid

 

 

“Hey guys. I purchased a pre-production version of the stealthswitch2 and I have to give the feedback that it totally rocks. I use one footpedal for vent, and the other to toggle my [modifier] macros in World of Warcraft.”

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Comments

45 Responses to “What is the StealthSwitch II?”
  1. bill says:

    Hi…I like the idea, but can you give more info on the other add ons…for instance, the 4th one, is that a continuous controller? Can all these be linked together to and triggered independently…sending continous control signals to programs like ableton live?

    thanks,

    Bill

    ps…Ableton accepts both midi and keystrokes etc…

    • hbarsky says:

      Hi Bill,
      The SS2 can be configured to send keystrokes, hotkeys (including modifiers) or mouse clicks. Once programmed, all settings are stored in the switch hardware so it can be easily moved to another computer and virtually guaranteeing compatibility with any application.

      The main SS2 has an integrated footswitch and connectors to add up to 4 additional slave footswitches. Each switch can be programmed and triggered independently. You can even add your own switches including guitar foot pedals. The only requirements are a momentary switch (non-latching) and a 1/8″(3.5mm) mono plug for each pedal. You can use an adapter to convert the guitar pedals which are normally 1/4″ plug to 1/8″.

      Configuration software is provided for both PC and MAC. You can save an unlimited number of configurations for different applications.

      You can also assign one of the footswitches to be a “shift” switch and then each of the remaining switches can have a “normal” and a “shifted” setting. This would enable you to program 9 different keystrokes using 5 footswitches. This works similar to the shift key on your keyboard.

      If Ableton supports keystrokes, should work great for up to 5 foot pedals.

      PS. I’m not sure what you mean by “continuous control signals”. If programmed for keystrokes like F1, it will work just like your keyboard including key repeat.

  2. AM says:

    Hi…I like the idea, but can you give more info on the other add ons…for instance, the 4th one, is that a continuous controller? Can all these be linked together to and triggered independently…sending continous control signals to programs like ableton live?

    thanks,

    Bill

    ps…Ableton accepts both midi and keystrokes etc…

    • hbarsky says:

      Hi Bill,
      If Ableton supports keystrokes (including modifiers), the StealthSwitch II should work great with Ableton. The SSII comes with 1 integrated switch and you can add up to 4 additional slave switches. Each slave switch can be triggered independently and can be configured to send a single keystroke or repeat if held down. If you need more than 5 footswitches, you can use multiple StealthSwitch II controllers. Or, you can designate one switch to be a “shift” switch which allows you to assign 2 different keystrokes to each remaining switch.

      The electronics are in the integrated footswitch built into the StealthSwitch II. The slave switches are simple momentary (sometimes called non-latching) switches. In fact you can use any momentary switch that terminates in a 1/8″(3.5mm) mono audio plug (like a Rock Band Foot Pedal). Many non-latching real guitar foot pedals also work great with the addition of a 1/4″ to 1/8″ adapter.

      We provide configuration software for both the PC and MAC. Once programmed, no software is required since all settings are stored in the SS2 controller. This approach virtually guarantees compatibility with any application that can be controlled with keystrokes, hotkeys or mouse clicks and makes for an extremely responsive controller.

      We have a 30 day return policy so you can see if it will work with Ableton Live.

  3. Adam says:

    Is the primary switch stuck as the original design (as opposed to the optional slave switch types)?
    It’s not a big deal, it would be nice to have one distinguished as the master, and that can be the “shift” key.

    Is the SHIFT function simply a copy of the keyboard’s shift key or is it a function of the pedals themselves?
    By that, I mean that if I am useing the pedals to assist in playing a game, and the keyboard’s SHIFT key is bound to say… the JUMP function in game, Would trying to use a pedal’s shifted function send a keyboard shift signal, thus causeing me to JUMP (assumeing I would prefer NOT to jump)?

    • hbarsky says:

      The electronics for the StealthSwitch II are integrated into the included footswitch. You can add up to 4 additional slave switches. Although the electronics are in footswitch #1, all 5 switches can be programmed independently to send keystrokes, mouse clicks or hotkeys.

      Any of the 5 switches can be designated to be the “shift” switch. This is not the shift keystroke on your keyboard but rather a function that we use internally. The way it works is you first assign a switch to have the “shift” function. Then you assign a “normal” and a “shifted” keystroke to each additional switch. If you press a switch without holding the “shift” switch down, it will send the normal keystroke assigned to that switch. If you hold the “shift” switch down and press another switch, it will send the “shifted” keystroke.

      You can also assign the “shift” switch to work in toggle mode so you don’t have to hold it down. In toggle mode, press the shift switch once and all other switches will send the “shifted” keystrokes when pressed. Press the shift switch again and all other switches are now back to sending normal keystrokes when pressed.

      Finally, if you are not using the shift toggle mode, the switch that is assigned to be the “shift” switch can also have a normal keystroke assigned to it. If the “shift” switch is pressed and released without pressing another switch, it will send the normal keystroke assigned to it. If the “shift” switch is held down and another switch is pressed, it will act as the “shift” switch. So, if you have 5 switches (integrated SSII switch plus 4 slave switches), you can program 9 different keystrokes.

      In summary, the SSII “shift” function is different from the keyboards shift key and is only used internally by the SSII hardware. However, if the keyboard’s SHIFT key is bound to the JUMP function in game, that would be an ideal setting to assign to one of the footswitches so you could jump using your feet.

      BTW, the programming is quick and intuitive. You can assign all 5 switch settings in a minute or two. If you use different switch configurations for different games, the SSII Configurator software allows you to save an unlimited number of configurations.

  4. Nate says:

    I just purchased the SSII and also got one FS-4 slave switch, as the reseller I purchased from had only the FS-4 as an option (so I didn’t realize their were others). Is there any functionality difference in the different slave switches, or are their intended physical differences other than aesthetics? For example, I noticed that the FS-4 takes slightly more pressure to engage, but is also a wee bit noisier than the SSII when functioning (not that I would call the sound it makes ‘noisy’ by any stretch.

    Thanks!

    • hbarsky says:

      The functionality of the slave switches are identical. The FS-1 slave switch is mechanically the same as the StealthSwitch II integrated switch and as you have observed has the quietest click sound (similar to the click a mouse button makes).

      The FS-2, FS-3 and FS-4 slave switches all require more force and travel to activate and have a slightly louder click sound and greater tactile feedback. This can also be an advantage since you can rest your foot on the switch without triggering it and it provides more tactile feedback.

      The bottom line is one of personal preference. Our most popular slave switches are the FS-1 and FS-4.

  5. Nate says:

    Awesome, thanks for the quick response here. I definitely like the FS-4, as leaving a foot on it when not active is super convenient. I just wanted to make sure I wasn’t missing anything with any of the other types. And from the sound of the comments above, I should to use a 2-switch setup like I now have, and get 3 different functions out of it if I use one of them as a momentary shift; and 3 for the price of 2 is awesome.

    Thanks.

  6. Dane says:

    I’m a little confused still. Do these switches send a “down” keystroke when pressed and “up” when lifted? Or is it always an up/down regardless of how long u press the switch? I’d like to program one of these to my be my ctrl key so that while i’m pressing it down it’s the same as holding the ctrl on my keyboard.

    • hbarsky says:

      Excellent question Dane. Yes, if you program a switch to be the ctrl key it will behave just like the ctrl key on your keyboard. Ctrl will be held down as long as you press the switch. There is also a “toggle mode” for ctrl, alt and shift where you press once for key down and press again for key up. The StealthSwitch II supports up to 5 independently programmable switches. So in summary, the SSII will work in your application exactly as you describe. We provide configuration software for both Windows and Mac.

      However, due to the design of Mac OSX, one keyboard can’t modify the keystrokes on another keyboard. The SSII can send keystrokes, hotkeys or mouse click in OSX but you can’t use the SSII to hold down the ctrl key and press another key on your keyboard like you can in Windows.

  7. Shawn says:

    What is the difference between Stealth Switch and Stealth Switch 2? Why should I buy one or the other?

    • hbarsky says:

      While the original StealthSwitch and the StealthSwitch II look quite similar, they are very different products with different uses and applications.

      The original StealthSwitch was designed as a computer privacy product. When someone comes in your office, press the foot pedal to hide your windows, press again to display. There are many options that can be configured that allow you to hide all open windows, only specific windows, mute the audio, etc. Supplied with software for both Windows and Macs.

      The StealthSwitch II was designed as a USB programmable foot pedal with built in support for up to 5 switches. You can program the SSII to send keystrokes, hotkeys and mouse clicks. Supplied with Configurator software for PCs and Macs to program an unlimited number of configurations. Once programmed, no software is required since all settings are stored in the switch hardware. This virtually eliminates any compatibility issues and makes the StealthSwitch II very responsive and portable – you can even move it from a PC to a Mac without installing any software. Typical applications include, Push-to-Talk footswitch for Ventrilo, TeamSpeak, World of Warcraft, trigger for photobooth software, footswitch control of teleprompter, etc. Basically any software that can be controlled with a keystroke, hotkey or mouse click will work with the StealthSwitch II.

  8. Joe says:

    Is the SSII available retail at any stores such as BestBuy or EB anything like that.

    • hbarsky says:

      Sorry, The StealthSwitch II is not available at Best Buy or EB. It is currently only available online. All orders received by 2pm Central Time ship the same day. We have shipped the SSII all over the world.

  9. xiaobao12 says:

    Hi,

    This product looks awesome. Before I buy it, I want to just make sure of one thing. I am a musician who would like to be able to turn pages in Adobe Acrobat (or Preview) on my Macbook Pro by using this step switch. Can it be programmed to do this without any problem?

    Thank you.

    • hbarsky says:

      The StealthSwitch II works great to turn pages in Acrobat on your Macbook Pro. The Mac OSX application that ships with the SSII is a native Mac application which means it was written from scratch for the Mac and is intuitive, fast and easy to use.

      The way it works is you configure a hotkey (or keyboard shortcut) for each switch and hit the program button. Once programmed, all settings are stored in the switch hardware so no software is required. You can even unplug the SS2 and plug it into another computer (Mac or PC) and it will work without installing any software or drivers. You can program keystrokes, hotkeys or mouse clicks. If your application can be controlled using a keystroke or hotkey, it will work with the StealthSwitch II.

      So, to turn pages in Adobe Acrobat Reader, you would configure one switch for “right arrow” to advance to the next page and another switch for “left arrow” for previous page. Here is a list of the Acrobat 9 keyboard shortcuts that you could use to program the SSII.

      The StealthSwitch II requires one “master” switch and you can add up to 4 optional slave switches. The StealthSwitch II FS-1 slave switch has the quietest click sound (similar to a mouse button click).

  10. ben says:

    Hello,

    I’d like to use this in world of warcraft. I currently have a nostromo N52 (programmable keyboard) that I programmed to spam a key when I push on a button. I mean it does keydown, keyup, wait 0.5 second and then again, keydown, keyup, and so on.
    It is not the same as holding down the key, since when I hold down the key my ablity is fired only once. I have to push the key repeatedly (that’s the key word here).

    I’d like to know if it’s possible to setup the stealthswitch II to do the same.

    Thanks.

    • hbarsky says:

      The StealthSwitch II can repeat a key if held down but won’t send multiple keydown, keyup, etc. sequences as you describe.

      However, using the killer combination of the StealthSwitch II and AutoHotkey, you can easily send as many repetitions of the keystrokes as you want with one press of the SSII. Simply set a hotkey for the StealthSwitch II to trigger your AutoHotkey script. Here is a link (scroll down to “Repeating or Holding down a Key

      AutoHotkey is a free, open-source utility for Windows with a great user support community. With the StealthSwitch II and AutoHotkey, there isn’t much you can’t do regarding footswitch automation.

      If you are new to AutoHotkey, make sure you start here When you have your AutoHotkey script working the way you want it, you can compile it into a standalone .exe to share with your teammates.

  11. Vicki says:

    Hi, I hope this isn’t a stupid question, but with all of the extensive operations that the StealthSwitch II is capable of doing, I just want to ask if you can program the unit to do something as simple as just acting as the right-click of a mouse? I am a software engineer by trade and an avid gamer in my off time and can spend quite a bit of time at my computer in a typical day. After working all day, I find that playing a right-click intensive game for any lengthy period (i.e. World of Warcraft) can be downright painful. I have tried every programmable mouse out there and while many are acceptable, they are almost all just a little too big to be intuitive and comfortable for very long. I have been looking for this type of foot solution for ages, so I hope this is something that can be done.

    • hbarsky says:

      Hi Vicki,

      Yes, the StealthSwitch II can be programmed for right mouse click. The other mouse functions that you can program are left mouse click, middle mouse click, double click, left mouse toggle (also called drag lock).

      You can add up to 4 independently programmable slave switches to the SSII. Many World of Warcraft players are using one of the footswitches for a push to talk switch for Ventrilo, TeamSpeak, WOW, etc. Any command that can be bound to a keystroke or hotkey will work with the SSII.

      Once programmed, all settings are stored in the SSII hardware so you can move it to another computer without installing any software. Just plug it in and you are good to go.

  12. Chris says:

    I just purchased a stealthswitch II and fs-1 to turn music pages. Many times when I push the switch it jumps more than 1 page at a time. It seems that I have to conciously make an effort to quickly tap the switch. The problem is its not always easy when I am focused on playing my instrument to also focus on tapping the switch and I sometimes leave my foot on the switch too long. Is there some way to fix this?

    • hbarsky says:

      Hi Chris,

      That’s an easy fix.

      Instead of programming as a standard keystroke, program as a macro. Each macro supports up to 4 keystrokes (one keystroke and up to 3 modifiers) but for your application, the important point is the way macros are processed. A macro is only sent once each time you press the switch even if you press and hold the switch down. This is in contrast to a normal keystroke that if held down repeats.

      So, program 1 switch as macro1 and another switch as macro2 and you should be good to go.

  13. James says:

    Hello.

    I was wondering can the StealthSwitch II be programed to focus a program in the background? Say F5 does something for 1 program, but the program I’m focusing is in the foreground and F5 does another function. Can I map the switch to perform the F5 function for the program in the background even though the one in the foreground is focused?

    Thanks.

    • hbarsky says:

      Once programmed, the StealthSwitch II works just like your keyboard or mouse. If you can perform a function with your keyboard, it will work with the SSII. So, if you program the SSII for F5, it will send the F5 keystroke to the program that has the focus (just like if you pressed F5 on your keyboard).
      However, if you combine the SSII with the open source program AutoHotkey you should be able to do almost anything. There is a bit of a learning curve with AutoHotkey, but it is a powerful program and supported by an extensive user community. There are many AutoHotkey tutorials. A quick search on Google or YouTube should get your started.

  14. CG says:

    How long is the cable?

  15. rob lipo says:

    I maybe interested in purchasing the SSll. My primary need is to scroll sheet music in a few different formats (doc,pdf,txt, etc.),up and down the page and back. My eyes are not what they use to be so I have the pages opened to 150%. From what I read so far it will provide that for me, right?
    If I am only using 2 or 3 of the switches, can it also operate any other piece of equipment running off of the computer such as a projector or audio controls?

    • hbarsky says:

      The SSII works great as a foot controller to scroll sheet music. You can independently program up to 5 footswitches. Each switch can be programmed as a keystroke, mouse click or hotkey. So if your software can be controlled with hotkeys it will work with the SSII. There is built in support for both Windows and Mac.

      One of the unique features of the SSII is the fact that once programmed all settings are stored in the switch itself. This virtually guarantees compatibility with any program.

      The SSII can operate any program that can be controlled with keystrokes or hotkeys, however the program must either have the focus (current program) or work with global hotkeys. There are also 3rd party programs like the open source AutoHotkey that allow you to control programs that don’t have the focus. You just write an AutoHotkey script that is triggered with a SSII hotkey.

  16. Frank says:

    I want to use The StealthSwitch II as a “coin accumulator”. In other words, can we program The StealthSwitch II to accept for example 4 clicks before it activates F4 keystroke? Just like inserting 4 coins into an arcade to start a game?
    Thanks.

    • hbarsky says:

      The StealthSwitch II can be programmed to send keystrokes, hotkeys or mouse clicks when a switch is pressed. It is easy to add your own switches and the SSII accepts up to 4 external switches. The only requirements for the switches are they have to be momentary contact and terminate in a 1/8″ (3.5mm) plug.

      Here is a link to the Breeze Systems website with instructions on how to add a coin acceptor using a StealthSwitch II.

  17. jeremy says:

    Can this be used to press STOP/PLAY on a DAW?

    I don’t really know a whole lot about midi or keystrokes so all that^^^ is greek to me.

    • hbarsky says:

      That depends on what DAW you are using. If it is computer based, uses either Windows or Mac and can be controlled with your keyboard, then yes.

      The StealthSwitch II can be configured to send keystrokes or hotkeys (keystrokes with modifiers like ctrl+alt+s for example) when a switch is pressed. So, if your computer based DAW STOP/PLAY command can be controlled with your computer keyboard, the SSII will work.

  18. jeremy says:

    GREAT~

    I guess my other question would be how long is the USB cord, the lengths of the slave pedals would be nice to know too.

    • hbarsky says:

      All cables are 6 feet long including USB and slave switches. The easiest way to increase the length of the switches is to use an audio extension cable on the slave switches. Audio extension cables are readily available in many different lengths and are quite reasonably priced. The USB spec limits the length of the USB cable to 3 meters (9.8 feet).

  19. Cheese says:

    Hi, I was wondering whether the FS-1 slave allows the user to rest their foot on the switch like the FS-4? It looks like a button that clicks as soon as you touch it so I just want to confirm. If you can rest your foot on it, does it go along one of the three slopes, or up on top? I’m not really catching the meaning of the tripod shape.

    I am trying to get a setup where my two feet are resting on a switch each for frequently used functions (lmouse, rmouse) and can quickly hit others when needed. I don’t know whether that means two FS-4 slaves for rest and two FS-1 slaves for quick hitting, or if I can just go all-FS1. Any recommendation?

    • hbarsky says:

      If you want to rest your foot on the switch, then the FS-4 is definitely the one you want. The FS-4 also requires a bit more travel to activate and has a more defined tactile feedback.

      The FS-1 is very responsive and sensitive like the switch in your mouse. You can use the FS-1 with your shoes off and click it with your toe instead of your whole foot but can’t rest your foot on the switch without it triggering. The FS-1 only has one switch inside, the design allows it to be oriented in any direction and still work.

      • Cheese says:

        Thank you for the information, and for your consistently prompt responses on this website. You got yourself a customer!

      • Cheese says:

        Hello again,

        I was wondering if and when any shipments were being sent to your Canadian distributors (both being owned by the same company). They have been out of stock on the FS-4 for over a month now, with my order on hold while they are under backorder (master + 2 FS1 + 2 FS4). If I order from here directly, will there be any issues with duties and brokerage?

        Thank you.

  20. Cheese says:

    Hello again,

    I was wondering if and when any shipments were being sent to your Canadian distributors (both being owned by the same company). They have been out of stock on the FS-4 for over a month now, with my order on hold while they are under backorder (master + 2 FS1 + 2 FS4). If I order from here directly, will there be any issues with duties and brokerage?

    Thank you.

    Sorry for repost, I’m thinking that you may not have been notified as I originally posted this as a response to my own comment.

  21. Cheese says:

    Hello,

    Is there any way to program a switch to push and hold two buttons? I want to hold num7 and num9. Individually this works fine (one per pedal) but I want to have one pedal push and hold both. I have a macro set up for num7 and num9 but it only sends the signal once. Any options within the configurator or is autohotkey intervention required?

  22. R says:

    Can the SSII and the SS3 be used on a computer simultaneously?

    • hbarsky says:

      Yes, the StealthSwitch II and the StealthSwitch3 can be used on the same computer simultaneously. You can also use multiple SSII’s or SS3′s on the same computer. The only issue is you have to only have one plugged in at a time while programming. Once programmed, you can plug in both the SSII and SS3.

  23. darren says:

    I am wanting to use a footswitch to change slides on a powerpoint presentation, will this switch do such?

    • hbarsky says:

      Absolutely. The StealthSwitch3 (SS3 replaced the StealthSwitch II) works great to change slides in a PowerPoint (or Apple Keynote) presentation. The StealthSwitch3 supports up to 5 fully programmable footswitches. Each switch is independently programmable to send keystrokes, hotkeys or mouse clicks. Once programmed, no software is required guaranteeing compatibility with any application. We have an intro special going on now that includes one free footswitch with your order.

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